Hawks for hunting

Falconry is a centuries-old form of hunting in numerous countries around the world. It is considered an integral aspect of many cultures, and was therefore added to the UNESCO Lists of Intangible Cultural Heritage as a living human heritage element in 2010.

Falconry involves a trained bird of prey that is instructed by a falconer to hunt its natural prey species. The birds can be falcons, hawks, or eagles: even a few owl species have successfully been used. The falconer releases his bird once he has seen a potential prey animal. The bird flies after the prey, and pins it to the ground. The falconer follows, kills the prey, and gives the hawk a compensatory food reward. Falconry can be practiced during regular hunting seasons.

Wetland ecology group_Stella Thompson_University of Helsinki_falconry

Several cultures utilize birds of prey for hunting. Lotta the goshawk hunts in Finland. ©Markku Kallinen

Falconry is practiced in many Arab nations, European countries (e.g. Great Britain and the Czech Republic), and in most US states, to name a few examples. The International Association for Falconry (IAF) carefully regulates falconry. The association’s objective is to advance the protection and conservation of birds of prey through falconry and awareness raising.

Despite conservation efforts, many people harbor negative feelings towards falconry. And true problems do exist; certain countries allow the crossbreeding of species. If hybrid hunting hawks manage to escape from captivity, they can weaken the genetic purity of local birds. Alien species are also used in certain areas. For example, Britain has imported Harris’s hawks (Parabuteo unicinctus) into the country for pheasant hunting, but escapees have been reported nesting in the wild. The ethics behind captive wild bird species and breeding them in captivity also remains an issue. On the other hand, falconry has also managed to lessen prejudices that people have harbored against birds of prey in many countries, and falconry organizations further the conservation of both birds of prey and other bird species by e.g. raising awareness and campaigning against illegal animal trafficking.

At one time, falconry was also popular in Finland, where the goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) was the bird of prey most used. Falconry is technically legal according to Finnish hunting legislation, but actually obtaining a hunting hawk is not easy in practice. Goshawks are protected in the country, so a native bird cannot be captured. Therefore a bird must be brought in from abroad. The bird cannot be an alien species, and individuals brought in must also be sterile, as goshawks in other countries are of different populations than in Finland.

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Markku and Lotta mainly hunt mountain hare. ©Pia Kallinen

However, Finland certifiably has one pair of hunting goshawk and falconer. Markku Kallinen and Lotta the goshawk uphold an old hunting tradition that disappeared during the 1960s. Markku and Lotta mainly hunt mountain hare (Lepus timidus). See a video of Lotta feeding, filmed by Pia Kallinen.

Lotta’s activities can be followed (in Finnish) at https://www.facebook.com/haukkametsastys/


Colour matters

Colour change is a surprisingly widespread feature in the animal kingdom. Rapid colour change occurs in both invertebrates and vertebrates. The feature has been observed in crustaceans, insects, cephalopods, amphibians, reptiles and fish.

There are two main methods for changing colour: morphological and physiological colour change. Morphological colour change is based on changes in the number and quality of pigmentophores, whereas physiological colour change is based on changes in the number of organella within the pigmentophores. Melanophores are the most common pigmentophores to have melanosomes. Physiological colour change is much faster than morphological colour change. It can happen in microseconds. Physiological colour change is regulated by the neuromuscular system in cephalopods and by the neuroendocrine system in other classes. Environmental factors, such as background, lighting conditions, temperature and moisture, along with behaviour and stress can trigger physiological colour change.

Animals capable of changing colour usually have more than one colour-change strategy. Environment, the number of predators, predator species and the presence of individuals of the same species influence the colour-change strategy. For example, the daisy parrotfish (or bullethead parrotfish, Chlorurus sordidus) has three different colourations: individuals have stripes, are all black or have an eye-dot on the tail. The purpose of the eye-dot is to frighten predators, whereas the all-black daisy parrotfish tries to blend in with its background and the striped daisy parrotfish tries to bluff or dazzle its predators. The occurrence of these colourations is influenced by environmental background, the body size of the daisy parrotfish and its social relationships. On the other hand, the common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) chooses its strategy by whether a predator hunts using vision or chemical signals (watch how the common cuttlefish changes its colour). Chameleons (Chamaeleonidae), however, change their colour according to the environmental background rather than to mimic or to frighten.

The common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) can change its colour. © Sari Holopainen

Temperature affects the melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) in many colour-changing animals such as fish, amphibians, reptiles and crustaceans. MSH is in charge of dispersing melanin. Changing to a dark or light colour helps an animal to either reflect or absorb heat. On the other hand, changing colour can concurrently predispose the animal to predation, because the animal is unable to blend in with its environment. The colour change of over 25 desert reptile species has been proven to depend on both environmental temperature and body temperature regulation. When it gets very warm (over +40°C) reptiles change to a lighter colour despite their background being somewhat dark. The reptiles usually still escape from predation because predators are inactive at such high temperatures. In proportion, when it gets cooler reptiles become darker than their environment, especially if they are near to cover.

Wetlands, the Earth’s kidneys

Wetlands are one of the world’s most important ecosystems. They are referred to as the “Earth’s kidneys” and that comparison could not be more accurate. Wetlands truly are as important to the planet as kidneys are to humans, with one exception: humans can survive with only one kidney, but the Earth cannot.

Kidneys are in charge of humans’ fluid balance. If we are dehydrated, our kidneys try to preserve as much water in our bodies as possible, and when we have excess water our bodies, our kidneys work to discharge the extra water. Wetlands work in the same way. They mitigate both floods and droughts by absorbing and recharging water.

A wetland photographed from a drone. © Antti Nykänen

In addition to fluid balance, kidneys are also responsible for removing unnecessary and hazardous substances, such as waste products and medical substances. In resemblance to our kidneys, wetlands purify our natural waters. They filter and remove nutrients and pollutants from our rain and floodwaters. Extra nutrients will sink to the bottom of the wetland and hence are available for wetland vegetation. Kidneys purify 1750 litres of blood every day, but the water purification ability of global wetlands is 30-fold. Wetlands purify 30 cubic litres of water daily.

Unfortunately, the world has lost approximately half of its wetlands, and Europe alone has destroyed and altered two-thirds of its wetlands. We need strong actions to retain the Earth’s functioning.

The value of wetlands is essential in urban environments, where nutrient and pollutant levels are manyfold compared to more natural environments. Urban wetlands should be seen as important and cheap tools to purify our stormwaters, along with maintaining biodiversity within cities.

A Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus) chick at a wetland in Finland. © Mia Vehkaoja

Luckily, the Ramsar Convention has acknowledged the importance of urban wetlands and themed this year’s World Wetland Day as “Wetlands for a Sustainable Urban Future”. Happy World Wetland Day 2018! Let’s appreciate the Earth’s vital organs.

Whooper swans don’t out-graze wigeons

A few decades ago the whoopers swan (Cygnus cygnus) was an endangered and rare species in Finland. It only bred in remote lakes and people rarely saw them. The population increase of whooper swans after protection is one of the success stories in Finnish nature conservation. Nowadays the swans can be heard gaggling all around Finland. The whooper swan is a large bird, and it thus consumes a lot of vegetation. Water horsetail (Equisetum fluviatile) is one of its favourites.

The whooper swan population has increased greatly, and their gaggling can be heard widely in Finland.

Certain other species also prefer water horsetails. For example, wigeon (Mareca penelope) broods forage within the horsetail growths searching for emerging invertebrates. A study published earlier this year showed that the water horsetail is disappearing from Finnish and Swedish lakes. The reasons for this pattern are unknown, but one possible explanation could be increased grazing pressure. Whooper swans effectively utilize horsetails, and swan grazing was therefore suspected to be influencing the disappearance of the horsetail. Wigeon populations have concurrently shown a worrying decrease.

A recently published study conducted of 60 Finnish and Swedish lakes utilized vegetation and waterbird data gathered in the early 1990s and in 2016. The study area widely covers the boreal, reaching from southern Sweden to Finnish Lapland. The whooper swan population increased strongly during the study period. Researchers studied whether whooper swans’ grazing on water horsetail is causing the negative trend in the wigeon population. Pair counts were used to indicate waterbird communities, and thus any changes caused during the brood time were not shown.

Whooper swans are grazers that have to consume a great deal of vegetation to survive.

The study showed that whooper swans strongly preferred lakes with horsetails during the 1990s, but this connections is not seen anymore. While the number of swan-occupied lakes has increased, the number of horsetail lakes has decreased dramatically. However, it appears that swans and disappearing horsetails do not associate, because the horsetail has also been from lakes where swans don’t occur. The horsetail has increased in some swan-occupied lakes.

The number of lakes used by wigeon has decreased, but swans are apparently not causing this. Wigeon loss has not been stronger on lakes occupied by swans. Quite the opposite, as wigeons and swans appear to positively correlate. Even though wigeons prefer horsetail lakes, their disappearance is not associated with the horsetail loss occurring in the study lakes, which suggests that wigeons can also utilize other lake types. On the other hand, the researchers note that this study  did not considered the critical brood time, when the foraging opportunities among the horsetail growths are especially important. Thus it may still be possible that wigeons are affected by horsetail loss, but this effect only appears during the brood time.

Read more:

Pöysä et al. 2017. Recovering Whooper Swans do not cause a decline in Eurasian Wigeon via their grazing impact on habitat. Journal of Ornithology.

Pöysä et al. 2017. Habitat associations and habitat change: seeking explanation for population decline in breeding Eurasian wigeon Anas penelope. Hydrobiologia.

Blog text: Vanishing wigeons and fading horsetails

Curious Finnish fireman rings 16 000 goldeneyes and Danish farmer rings 12 000 starlings – the most amazing examples of citizen science


Pentti Runko ringing a small goldeneye duckling.

While scientist struggle with short-term funding periods, the curiosity for nature that the general public shows, can unearth mechanisms that can only be found with long-term datasets. The persistent and systematic observations made by nature enthusts enables research about climate change or life history traits over several generations. Both are issues that require long-term research – and a lot of time and effort. Below are some examples of remarkable work done by citizen scientists curious about nature.

16 000 ringed goldeneyes have passed through the hands of a Finnish fireman

Finnish fireman Pentti Runko has collected systematic data of goldeneyes for several scientific studies. After starting his work in 1984, by 2017 Runko has ringed an amazing 16 000 goldeneyes and checked several hundreds of nest boxes every year.

In a recently published study, the authors utilized data concerning 14 000 of these goldeneyes ringed by Runko between the years 1984-2014. Among these goldeneyes were 141 females that were ringed as ducklings and recaptured later in the area. Based on these data it was possible to follow the recruit females’ lives from hatching to breeding. Thus the early life circumstances of these females are known, and the circumstances can be used to study their effects later on in life. In some cases early life circumstances have severe results on subsequent life, for example on breeding performance (duckling video).

Goldeneyes lay eggs in the nest boxes (video), which Runko checks for eggs several time during the season, to evaluate the hatching dates (video), to catch females and to ring ducklings.

The study was able to show deviations between individuals during the first breeding years and how circumstances during early life affected the breeding statistics of these females. Most females began breeding at the age of 2, but 44% delayed the start of breeding. Winter severity of the first two years affected the timing of breeding, but did not affect which year the females began breeding. As a conclusion, it appears that certain traits buffer the effects that the severity of the first weeks have, so the breeding parameters of females are not affected.  The research also showed that first-time breeders tend to begin breeding later than the yearly specific averages.

After ringing ducklings get back to the nest box.

The authors of another study used a set of 405 females and their offspring’s ringed by Runko, and found that the females’ condition matters when it comes to breeding success. Older, early-nesting females with good body condition and larger broods were able to produce more female recruits for the local population. The later the females bred, the less recruits they produced. The study also showed that females tend to adjust their breeding according to the ice-out dates of lakes. However, differences were observed between the flexibility of the females. Because early-breeding goldeneyes succeed better, the authors conclude that selection favours early-breeding individuals.

The lives and breeding habits of goldeneye females are closely followed at Maaninka (video).

Climate change effects can also be observed from goldeneye phenology. Runko showed that during the last 30 years goldeneyes have advanced their egg-laying dates by 12 days.

45 years of starling surveys in a farmer’s backyard reveal climate warming

Starlings are becoming scarce in Europe.

The Danish Ornithological Society Journal recently published a study that utilized data gathered by a Danish farmer, who ringed starlings for 45 years. Dairy farmer Peder V. Thellesen ringed ca. 12 000 starlings nesting in 27 nest boxes, and measured their phenology systematically. The data showed that during the study period starlings advanced their egg-laying dates by more than 9 days. This advance was observed in both first and second clutches. The result reflects the increase in April temperatures. Another important observation was that while no change was observed in clutch size and hatching rate, nest box occupancy has fallen dramatically in recent years. Starlings used to be common in Europe, but now they have decreased widely in Europe, also in Denmark. Changes in agricultural land use, especially decreased cattle grazing, are suspected as one example affecting starling populations. Loss of cattle-grazed land means less insect-rich foraging lands for the birds.


Read more:

Fox, T. and Heldbjerg, H. 2017. Ornithology: Danish dairy farmer delivers data coup. Nature.

Pöysä, H., Clark, R. G., Paasivaara, A. and Runko, P. 2017. Do environmental conditions experienced in early life affect recruitment age and performance at first breeding in common goldeneye females? Journal of Avian Biology.

Clark, R. G., Pöysä, H., Runko, P. and Paasivaara, A. 2014. Spring phenology and timing of breeding in short-distance migrant birds: phenotypic responses and offspring recruitment patterns in common goldeneyes. Journal of Avian Biology.

Kari S. Maattinen Youtube videos about goldeneyes

Thellesen, P.V. Common Starling Sturnus vulgaris clutch size, brood size and timing of breeding during 1971-2015 in Southwest Jutland, Denmark. The Danish Ornithological Society Journal.

YLE 2016: Lintuharrastaja on uhrannut kevätlomansa telkänpoikasille jo 30 vuoden ajan – “Se voisi olla Suomen kansallislintu”. In Finnish.

YLE 2013: Linnut pesivät nyt viikkoja aikaisemmin kuin 1980-luvulla


Traffic flattens billions of frogs every year

Amphibians are run over by cars more often than other vertebrates. Per road kilometer, an average 250 amphibian individuals die every year because of traffic. According to this calculation, over 113.5 million frogs die annually on the Finnish road network (454 000 km). In Brazil, one of the world’s amphibian hot spots, traffic annually kills 9 420 frogs on each road kilometer. This means a total of over 16 billion frogs lost due to traffic.


Roads built near wetlands are the most significant cause of frog mortality on all continents, but particularly in Europe. No relief is in sight for this problem, because traffic amounts are increasing every year throughout the world.


Fast-moving frog species are somewhat fortunate because their traffic mortality is quite low on roads with little traffic (24–40 cars per hour). Up to 94% of fast-moving frogs survive when crossing a road. Slow-moving species, such as the common toad (Bufo bufo), are not that lucky. Only half of common toads survive to the other side of a road. On busier roads (60 cars in an hour) over 90% of common toads are run over by a car.

A dead common toad (Bufo bufo) hit by a car. © Mia Vehkaoja

Amphibians suffer from both direct and indirect negative effects of road networks and traffic. Mortality is a direct cause, whereas isolation is an indirect cause. Amphibians migrate according to seasons: during spring to their breeding grounds and during autumn to their wintering grounds. These migrations make amphibians vulnerable to traffic mortality. Season migrations occur particularly in the temperate zone, such as in Europe, where traffic has become the greatest threat to amphibian survival in certain places.


The traffic mortality of frogs decreases population sizes and reduces migration, which lead to a decreasing gene flow between populations and the disappearance of genetic diversity. Smaller populations are at greater risk of going extinct.


Historically thousands of kilometers of roads have been built through wetlands, which leads to the disappearance, isolation and depletion of wetland habitats. Roads also influence the cycle and function of water systems. Road construction has drained and polluted wetlands all over the world.


Conservation actions should concentrate not only on restricting road construction laws and regulations, but on preventing frogs from accessing roads by installing culverts and fences. According to a French study, the combination of culverts and fences is the most efficient way for saving frogs from traffic mortality. But this is just one study, and unfortunately we still know too little about which methods are best for amphibian conservation.

A requiem for birds killed by alien predators

A small pond in the Finnish countryside is filled with squeaking, when several goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) and wigeon (Mareca penelope) broods are foraging. Suddenly a goldeneye hen alerts and flies cackling across the pond. The figure of an American mink (Neovison vison) appears on the water surface, which leads to an emergency escape of the duck broods. The American mink is an efficient predator, which does not belong in Finnish nature. Nonetheless it has already occupied the whole country. Alien species in Finland and other countries are a serious threat to birds.

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Duck broods escape after a watchful goldeneye female alerts after spotting an American mink.

A fur farming runaway became a nuisance

The American mink is, as its name reveals, an American species, which was brought to North Europe at the beginning of the 20th century. Minks escaped from farms and were successful in Europe. They were also introduced to nature on the Russian side. Rapidly American minks occupied all of Fennoscandia.

The American mink utilizes various wetlands, lakes and archipelagos, where it predates birds and limits their populations. Minks don’t only eat birds, but also their eggs. The American mink is especially harmful in Fennoscandian archipelagos, because birds are not adapted to such predators. Certain bird species, such as the black guillemot (Cepphus grylle), are especially threatened by mink predation. Traditionally Fennoscandia has not had such predators. The European mink (Mustela lutreola), which is now extinct from many of its historical areas, did not occupy the archipelago in the same way as its American cousin does.

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The American mink is currently a common wetland species in Fennoscandia.

Raccoon dog ended up on EU’s black list

The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is an Asian species that was introduced to the European parts of the Soviet Union to be hunted for its fur. From the Soviet the raccoon dogs spread west. Soon raccoon dogs occupied all of Finland, and are now also reaching Sweden. Currently Finnish hunters are working to prevent raccoon dogs from going over the Swedish border. The raccoon dog was recently classified as an invasive alien species by the European Union. One reason for this is its influence on birds.

Wetland ecology group_University of Helsinki_supikoira_raccoon dog_vieraslaji

Raccoon dog destroys an artificial duck nest. Game camera photo.

Research conducted at the Helsinki University shows that raccoon dog density and predation pressure on artificial nests correlates on wetlands. Other studies have found raccoon dogs to destroy both pheasant and duck nests. Thus raccoon dog removal around wetlands is an important way to protect birds.

And then there were no Stephens Island wrens left

A cat named Tibbles carried little birds to a light house yard on an island of New Zealand in the late 1800s. The birds were Stephens Island wrens (Xenicus lyalli). The cat hunted at least 15, after which apparently none were left. Rats and cats might already have killed the wren populations from the other islands. The Stephens Island wren is not the only victim of cats. Australian researchers have counted that domestic cats have killed at least 20 native species. In the USA cats are estimated to kill 3,7 milliard (3.7 billion) birds annually. Most birds are killed by unowned cats. Cats therefore appear to kill more birds than any other anthropogenic cause in the USA. Worldwide cats have killed 33 animal species to extinction.

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A cat stalking a duck brood in a wetland. In this case cutting the vegetation saved the brood.

The raccoon is occupying Europe

In addition to the American mink, the raccoon (Procyon lotor) has also arrived in Europe from North America. The raccoon was also brought Europe to be farmed for its fur. This highly adaptable animal has succeeded well in Europe, and is now common for example in Germany and France. The population size in Germany is already evaluated at over a million. Raccoons are spreading north, and are currently settled in Denmark and individuals have also been found in Sweden. Compared to raccoon dogs, raccoons also live successfully in cities. But just like raccoon dogs, raccoons are also well adapted to the wetland environment, and are thus harmful to waterbirds.

Raccoons reproduce effectively, and therefore their extirpation is impossible once a population has been established. This is why efforts need to be focused on stopping the species from spreading. The raccoon is classified as an invasive alien species in the EU, so farming them or having one as a pet is illegal.

Read more:

Väänänen, V.-M. 2007: The effect of raccoon dog Nyctereutes procyonoides removal on waterbird breeding success. Suomen Riista (PDF)

PHYS.ORG 29.1. 2014: Cats in US kill billions of birds, mammals, study finds

Loss, S.R. et al. 2013: The impact of free-ranging domestic cats on wildlife of the United States. Nature Communications

Marra, P. & Santella C. 2017. Cat Wars. The Obituary of the Stephens Island Wren

Spiegel Online 3.8.2012. Germany Overrun by Hordes of Masked Omnivores

NOBANIS Invasive Alien fact sheets, Raccoon (PDF)