Curious Finnish fireman rings 16 000 goldeneyes and Danish farmer rings 12 000 starlings – the most amazing examples of citizen science


Pentti Runko ringing a small goldeneye duckling.

While scientist struggle with short-term funding periods, the curiosity for nature that the general public shows, can unearth mechanisms that can only be found with long-term datasets. The persistent and systematic observations made by nature enthusts enables research about climate change or life history traits over several generations. Both are issues that require long-term research – and a lot of time and effort. Below are some examples of remarkable work done by citizen scientists curious about nature.

16 000 ringed goldeneyes have passed through the hands of a Finnish fireman

Finnish fireman Pentti Runko has collected systematic data of goldeneyes for several scientific studies. After starting his work in 1984, by 2017 Runko has ringed an amazing 16 000 goldeneyes and checked several hundreds of nest boxes every year.

In a recently published study, the authors utilized data concerning 14 000 of these goldeneyes ringed by Runko between the years 1984-2014. Among these goldeneyes were 141 females that were ringed as ducklings and recaptured later in the area. Based on these data it was possible to follow the recruit females’ lives from hatching to breeding. Thus the early life circumstances of these females are known, and the circumstances can be used to study their effects later on in life. In some cases early life circumstances have severe results on subsequent life, for example on breeding performance (duckling video).

Goldeneyes lay eggs in the nest boxes (video), which Runko checks for eggs several time during the season, to evaluate the hatching dates (video), to catch females and to ring ducklings.

The study was able to show deviations between individuals during the first breeding years and how circumstances during early life affected the breeding statistics of these females. Most females began breeding at the age of 2, but 44% delayed the start of breeding. Winter severity of the first two years affected the timing of breeding, but did not affect which year the females began breeding. As a conclusion, it appears that certain traits buffer the effects that the severity of the first weeks have, so the breeding parameters of females are not affected.  The research also showed that first-time breeders tend to begin breeding later than the yearly specific averages.

After ringing ducklings get back to the nest box.

The authors of another study used a set of 405 females and their offspring’s ringed by Runko, and found that the females’ condition matters when it comes to breeding success. Older, early-nesting females with good body condition and larger broods were able to produce more female recruits for the local population. The later the females bred, the less recruits they produced. The study also showed that females tend to adjust their breeding according to the ice-out dates of lakes. However, differences were observed between the flexibility of the females. Because early-breeding goldeneyes succeed better, the authors conclude that selection favours early-breeding individuals.

The lives and breeding habits of goldeneye females are closely followed at Maaninka (video).

Climate change effects can also be observed from goldeneye phenology. Runko showed that during the last 30 years goldeneyes have advanced their egg-laying dates by 12 days.

45 years of starling surveys in a farmer’s backyard reveal climate warming

Starlings are becoming scarce in Europe.

The Danish Ornithological Society Journal recently published a study that utilized data gathered by a Danish farmer, who ringed starlings for 45 years. Dairy farmer Peder V. Thellesen ringed ca. 12 000 starlings nesting in 27 nest boxes, and measured their phenology systematically. The data showed that during the study period starlings advanced their egg-laying dates by more than 9 days. This advance was observed in both first and second clutches. The result reflects the increase in April temperatures. Another important observation was that while no change was observed in clutch size and hatching rate, nest box occupancy has fallen dramatically in recent years. Starlings used to be common in Europe, but now they have decreased widely in Europe, also in Denmark. Changes in agricultural land use, especially decreased cattle grazing, are suspected as one example affecting starling populations. Loss of cattle-grazed land means less insect-rich foraging lands for the birds.


Read more:

Fox, T. and Heldbjerg, H. 2017. Ornithology: Danish dairy farmer delivers data coup. Nature.

Pöysä, H., Clark, R. G., Paasivaara, A. and Runko, P. 2017. Do environmental conditions experienced in early life affect recruitment age and performance at first breeding in common goldeneye females? Journal of Avian Biology.

Clark, R. G., Pöysä, H., Runko, P. and Paasivaara, A. 2014. Spring phenology and timing of breeding in short-distance migrant birds: phenotypic responses and offspring recruitment patterns in common goldeneyes. Journal of Avian Biology.

Kari S. Maattinen Youtube videos about goldeneyes

Thellesen, P.V. Common Starling Sturnus vulgaris clutch size, brood size and timing of breeding during 1971-2015 in Southwest Jutland, Denmark. The Danish Ornithological Society Journal.

YLE 2016: Lintuharrastaja on uhrannut kevätlomansa telkänpoikasille jo 30 vuoden ajan – “Se voisi olla Suomen kansallislintu”. In Finnish.

YLE 2013: Linnut pesivät nyt viikkoja aikaisemmin kuin 1980-luvulla



One thought on “Curious Finnish fireman rings 16 000 goldeneyes and Danish farmer rings 12 000 starlings – the most amazing examples of citizen science

  1. You actually make it seem really easy with your presentation however I in finding this topic to be actually something which I feel I might by no means understand. It kind of feels too complex and extremely vast for me. I’m having a look ahead in your subsequent publish, I’ll try to get the dangle of it!

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